Question: What Makes A Bad Villain?

What makes a villain a villain?

A villain is the antagonist of your story whose motivations and actions oppose the protagonist and drive the plot of your story.

A villain is the opposite of a hero.

In contrast to the hero, a villain is usually compelled by a desire to commit acts of cruelty and immorality..

How do you write a terrifying villain?

How to Make Your Villain ThreateningConvey Why Your Villain Is Threatening. Rowling describes Voldemort’s crimes in depth before Harry has to face him. … Avoid Theatrics. Traditional depictions of Dracula are now silly rather than frightening. … Keep Them Mysterious. … Make Them Competent. … Slowly Escalate the Threat Level.

Who is the most evil villain ever?

The Greatest Villains Of All TimeDarth Vader. The Star Wars trilogy (1977-1983) Star Wars: Episode III – Revenge Of The Sith (2005), Rogue One (2016)The Joker. Batman (1966), Batman (1989), The Dark Knight (2008) … Loki. The Thor films (2011-2017), The Avengers (2012) … Hans Gruber. Die Hard (1988) … Hannibal Lecter. … Hans Landa. … Kylo Ren. … Anton Chigurh. … More items…•

What are good villain motives?

15 Interesting Motivations for Villains and HeroesRomance. Villains frequently have ulterior motives (like marrying Aunt May to steal the nuclear power plant she inherited?) and improper means (such as sabotaging rivals). … Revenge. … To distinguish oneself. … To fit in/gain acceptance. … Justice. … Greed. … Fear. … Desperation.More items…•

What is an archetypal villain?

The Villain Archetype tends to display the following characteristics: Tends to be evil purely to be evil. Don’t care who else is hurt in the process. Tends to be complete opposite of Hero Archetype. Selfish, egotistical, power-hungry.

How is the joker a villain?

Joker is the greatest villain because he’s the most suited to his opposite, the hero, who also happens to be the greatest superhero: Batman. Villains are rarely created without a hero in mind and Joker was created to challenge Batman specifically, a non-powered superhero, hence Joker’s lack of superpowers as well.

What characteristics make a villain?

Villain Characteristics Checklist:He’s convinced he’s the good guy.He has many likeable qualities.He’s a worthy enough opponent to make your hero look good.You (and your reader) like when he’s on stage.He’s clever and accomplished enough that people must lend him begrudging respect.He can’t be a fool or a bumbler.More items…

How can I make my villain like me?

Six Ways to Make Your Villain LikableMake Them Cool and Competent. It’s hard to hate a villain with style. … Help Your Audience Understand Them. … Bestow Them With Moral Strengths. … Create a Tragic Backstory. … Give Them Justifiable Motivation. … Make Them an Underdog.

What is a true villain?

A villain is a bad person — real or made up. In books, movies, current events, or history, the villain is the character who does mean, evil things on purpose. … In the 1300s, villain described a low-born rustic. It came from the Medieval Latin word villanus, or farmhand.

How can I make a villain backstory?

Here are 5 quick steps to create kick-ass villains.Understand Their Why. Some people use character interviews or sheets to develop their villain; others wing it as they go. … Motive and Goal. Motives and goals are closely linked: … Make the Conflict Specific. … Know Your Cliché From Your Trope. … Make Your Villain Unbeatable.

How do you make the main character a villain?

How to Write a Villain Protagonist in 6 StepsMix character traits. When protagonists are either extremely moral characters or extremely immoral characters, it might be hard for readers to relate to them. … Keep the stakes high. … Use internal monologue. … Understand the character’s morality. … Build the backstory. … Consider your antagonist.

How do you reveal a villain?

The Immediate RevealWithhold the villain’s identity from the protagonist/other main characters.Place the villain in a symbolically “unreachable” place, where he/she can taunt the hero at will.Describe in detail the villain weaving his/her plot, right under the noses of the protagonists.